Showing posts with label Nymphenburg. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nymphenburg. Show all posts

Nazi-era sites around Munich (5)

Staatskanzlei and Munich War Memorial
 
From 1905-1945, this housed the Bavarian Army Museum, founded by Ludwig II. Destroyed during the war with only the dome remaining, it has since been rather impressively reconstructed and is now used by the Bavarian government. In front of the building, beneath a Travertine slab, is a crypt commemorating the unknown soldier.

 During the November 1918 Revolution, and two photographs from memorial ceremonies in December 1924 and November 1931.
The tomb of the Unknown Soldier then and today. Originally erected in front of the former Army Museum (now the Bavarian State Chancellery) in the Hofgarten in 1924 to commemorate the 2 million dead of the Great War, the 'Dead Soldier' sculpted by Bleekers now dedicated to the dead of both world wars. It was also used as a backdrop for nationalist and militaristic propaganda during the Nazi era. Annual remembrance days for war heroes were organised here by both the Wehrmacht and the Nazi party from 1934 onwards. This war memorial modelled on a megalithic tomb was already one of the most visited war memorials in Germany even during the Weimar Republic. Its centrepiece is a crypt in which Bernhard Bleeker’s idealised figure of the “dead soldier” is laid out, representing the 13,000 Munich soldiers who fell in the First World War and whose names were once engraved on the walls of a further walkway that circumscribed the memorial. Damaged during the Second World War, the war memorial was restored on the orders of the American military government, albeit without the names of the 13,000 dead. In the 1950s an inscription was added commemorating the fallen soldiers and civilian victims of the years 1939 to 1945. This dedication reflects the desire of the population to continue commemorating the war dead even after 1945, although its portrayal of both the city and its population exclusively as victims represents a very one-dimensional view. To this day military ceremonies in honour of the dead are still held regularly at the war memorial.

Directly in front is the Memorial for the Resistance
Leo Kornbrust’s memorial was unveiled on 24 July 1996 by the Bavarian Minister president Dr. Edmund Stoiber. It is engraved on one side with a line of block letters reading "Zum erinnern zum gedenken" ("To Recall and to Commemorate") under which is a reproduction of a handwritten letter by Generalfeldmarschall Erwin von Witzleben who was arrested the day after the attempted July plot. 
Wir wollen hier nicht urteilen über die verschiedenen möglichen Staatsformen, nur eines will eindeutig und klar herausgehoben werden: jeder Mensch hat einen Anspruch auf einen brauchbaren und gerechten Staat, der die Freiheit des Einzelnen als auch das Wohl der Gesamtheit sichert.
Freiheit der Rede, Freiheit des Bekenntnisses, Schutz des einzelnen Bürgers vor der Willkür verbrecherischer Gewaltstaaten.
Das sind die Grundlagen des neuen Europa.
(We will not pass judgement on the various possible forms of government as only one will be raised clear and unambiguously: every person has a right to a useful and just state that guarantees the freedom of the individual and to he general welfareFreedom of speech, freedom of religion, the protection of individual citizens from the arbitrary will of criminal regimes of violenceThese are the foundations of the new Europe.)
During his trial he was forced to appear in court without his belt and false teeth. On August 8, 1944 he was executed by being hanged by piano wire from a meat hook.

ϟϟ-Deutschland-Kaserne
ϟϟ-Deutschland-Kaserne
These barracks were primarily used by the ϟϟ-Standarte 1 Deutschland until the end of World War II. They had taken part in the annexation of Austria and later the occupation of the Sudetenland before contributing to the annexation of Bohemia and Moravia in March, 1939. It was ordered by Hitler that it should be expanded to a division but the war interrupted this plan. It took part in the invasion of Poland attached to Panzer-Division Kempf and following that campaign it was used to form ϟϟ-Division Verfügungstruppe (later renamed Das Reich). After the war the UNESCO used the buildings to accommodate dispersed persons.

Funk-Kaserne
Funk-Kaserne
Dating from 1936, now used by the police.

Just outside the reichsadler remains, shorn of its swastika (although traces are left).

 Nazi Housing Development
The government of Chancellor Brüning in 1931 established the small settlement programme in order "to promote the population becoming settled in the country to reduce unemployment and to facilitate sufficient living conditions for the unemployed." The future settlers were to be involved in the establishment of their own homes and gardens and small animal husbandry to improve their supply in the economic crisis. The Nazis took over the model because it fit into their anti-modern and anti-urban ideology. 

According to Geoff Walden of Third Reich in Ruins, this first building at Kurfürstenplatz "was likely part of a Third Reich neighbourhood housing development (Siedlung) built in 1938. The Siedlung included a savings bank and a police office, and this building may have been one of those." friend_of_Obersalzberg, who contributed the photo on the left, confirms that it was built in 1938 by architect Hans Atzenbeck.
At that time it was necessary to build new healthy and cheap apartments in Munich. It has 5 entrances and so 5 living units. In the first floor (Erdgeschoß) were stores. In the courtyard was a fountain with a sculpture of a drumming Hitlerjunge. The swastikas and the fountain were removed after war.
Google Street view actually blocks the image of the entire building! Google isn't known for respecting privacy, so could this have been pushed by the authorities given the remaining Nazi-era reliefs?
 February 26, 1938
The coat of arms of Munich on the building with its form under the Nazis and today.
Better photos of the building can be found on the the Munich thread at Axis History.

These siedlung on Klugstrasse all have bizarre Third Reich, astrological, masonic, and other obscure symbols over every door frame leading inside. To me, it's incredible that they continue to survive and form the entrances to people's homes:

The swastika is still faintly visible...

...whilst this one, dated 1933, is obscured by the shaking hands

Here the hakenkreuz has been erased, but the Nazi salutes allowed to remain!

Another excised swastika that completed the DAF symbol

And yet a couple have had their bizarre symbols completely removed.


The left image shows swords and a steel helmet whilst the one on the right reminds me of the lesson from the Disney wartime cartoon Education for Death...




Mustersiedlung Ramersdorf
  Mustersiedlung Ramersdorf
The sample settlement at Ramersdorf was opened on 9 June 1934 to serve as a model for future settlement projects in Germany. Designed by Guido Habers, this siedlung on Stephanskirchener Straße provided 192 homes with 34 different building types and planned as an alternative to the multi-storey urban houses. The ensemble is self-contained and , pursuant to the garden city idea numerous green spaces.  As executive architects , among others , Friedrich Ferdinand Haindl , Sep Ruf , Franz Ruf , Lois Knidberger , Albert Heichlinger , Max Dellefant , Theo Pabst, Christoph Miller, Hanna Loev Delisle and Charles were responsible for the buildings. The hoped-for propaganda effect of the settlement did not materialise because, among other things, the generous living space for those days 56-129 m2 and individual modernist elements were criticized.  After the exhibition, the settlement houses were sold as homes. In 1935 a Protestant church building was opened with the Gustav Adolf Church in the settlement as shown in the then-and-now photos.

A number of frescoes remain, barely, from 1934:
 St. Christopher on Stephanskirchener Straße 20
 
 Above a door on Schlechinger Weg 4 is this coat of arms; the former owner was Paerr and therefore he chose a play on words in the arms of a bear- Bärenwappen. Above one can still make out the inscription "G. P. 1934".
 At Schlechinger Weg 8 is this image of a German African colonial soldier. The original owner had served in Deutsch-Südwestafrika and designed the crest himself before giving it to the artist, Günther Graßmann.
 
Another by Günther Graßmann at Schlechinger Weg 10. The pointer of the sundial is at the centre of a sun, with the dial in the form of an harp. As can be seen in the 1934 photo, the bottom of the fresco depicts a sailing ship. Graßmann was involved in another sundial for the church of St. Raphael, München-Hartmannshofen; I think he was involved in its stained glass, as well: http://www.sankt-raphael-muenchen.de/sonstiges.html
 
Remarkably, the Adolf-Hitler-Brunnen still remains intact at Herrenchiemseestraße 44. On the base of the fountain a swastika with a lime leaf in raised relief was etched and at the back was the following inscription:
 DIESER·BRUNNEN·
WURDE·UNTER·DER HITLERLINDE·
UND·GLEICHZEITIG·MIT·DIESER·GESETZT·
ZUR·ERÖFFNUNG·DER·DEUTSCHEN·SIEDLUNGS·AUSSTELLUNG·
MÜNCHEN·1934
The blocks of stone with the swastika and lime leaf above the water spout were removed after 1945. as was the term " Hitler Linde". This fountain is one of the 75 drinking water wells in Munich.
 
Another water well at Törwanger Straße 2. In 1938 a small mosaic was set up as seen in the photo with a swastika by the painter Günther Grassmann. The mosaic has been coated with a thin layer of plaster and is left empty, the well no longer in operation.

Siedlung on Erich Kastner str.
This example of a siedlung consists of an huge building and on all four corners there are Third Reich reliefs.
The swastikas have been wiped out from the bottom of each relief

93 Winzererstr.
Another surviving building from the Nazi era with its iconography intact (with the colour still maintained) complete with reichsadler dating from 1936 found by odeon at Axis History Forum.
 
From 1933 to 1937 the Nazis set up Reichskleinsiedlung here at Am Hart, Neuherberg and Kaltherberg after which time the housing policy increasingly turned back to the multi-storey, which could be accomplished more efficiently and cheaper.

Two unidentified adlers stumbled upon in Munich:
Can't find any information on this in terms of its date; found accidentally on Liebigstr. whilst walking along the river to Prinzregentenstr.
Another found at the other end of town on Orleanstr. showing a distinctive eagle of indeterminate origin.
Nazi mementos I found being sold in the front window of a Munich antique shop. It's but one of many I found which surprised me given the country's supposed strict laws concerning the open display of such items (unless used publicly by the Government itself). All swastikas were covered with a round sticker which seems as useful as censoring swear words on television.


Schloss Nymphenburg
Within walking distance of Heydrich's house is this, the biggest Baroque palace in Germany, and site of the 1938 Nazi production of "De Nacht van de Amazonen". The photo on the left shows the site during the so-called Day of German Art Festival during the weekend of July 14-16, 1939 in Munich.

Schloss Nymphenburg unterm Hakenkreuz and today
Rarely seen amateur colour footage filmed in Friedberg and Munchen in 1938 showing the night masquerade "De Nacht van de Amazonen." The "Burgmaister" of Munchen obtained from the local "Gaulaiter" (the city's Nazi Party chief) the permission for the girls on the chariots to parade with sexy costumes.

Former home of Reinhard Heydrich

This is a photo from my last visit of Reinhard Heydrich's home outside Munich at Zuccalistrasse 4 near Nymphenburg castle. Of this house his wife Lina wrote "When unexpected visitors arrive, the architecture of the house makes it possible for us to make everything disappear in time. Our dog gives us plenty of warning."
At the end of the war, Heydrich's widow returned to the island of Fehmarn with her surviving children. She owned and ran a hotel and restaurant. The Finnish theatre director and poet Mauno Manninen (1915-1969) was a frequent guest at the hotel. He took pity on the difficulties she experienced as a result of her infamous name and offered to marry her to enable her to change it. They married in 1965 but did not live together. She died on August 14, 1985.
See the special Prague section on Operation Anthropoid


 
Grünwalder Stadion einst und jetzt.
 
It was built in 1911 and was the home ground for TSV 1860 München until 1995. During refurbishment of the dilapidated stadium, an unexploded Second World War bomb was found buried within the pitch.
 

Auferstanden aus Ruinen

Hackerbrücke after the war and today

The Staatsbibliothek on Ludwigstraße then and now.

What had been an air protection shelter on Hotterstraße was converted in 1947 to an hotel in the town centre.

American troops on Dachauerstr. on April 30, 1945 and the site today.
Completed in 1932, the post office at Goetheplatz after the war and today.
The city brook that run down Baaderstraße and Ickstattstraße shown in 1946 has long dried up.

Sebastiansplatz in 1946 and today
The former site of the Palaeontological Museum at Neuhauser Straße 51 after being completely destroyed during the April 24th 1944 bombing; 80% of all its fossils were destroyed as well. After the war it was relocated here at Richard-Wagner-Straße 10.
The interior of the Paläontologische Museum in 1949, after the interior was severely damaged from an high-explosive bomb
 
Building the U-Bahn station at the corner of Lindwurmstraße and Rothmundstraße in May, 1938.
 
American tank outside the Imperial Lichtspiele cinema, now the Anna Hotel
 
The Markuskirche then and now
 
The gaol at Corneliusstraße no longer exists postwar