Showing posts with label Waldmünchen. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Waldmünchen. Show all posts

More Sites in Bavaria (3)

Neumarkt

Bird's-eye-view then and now
 
A Nazi memorial to Dietrich Eckart, one of the important early members of the NSDAP and a participant of the 1923 Beer Hall Putsch. It was to him that Hitler had dedicated the second volume of Mein Kampf in which he is described as a martyr and is referred to in the last sentence of the book:
And among them I could also reckon that man who as no one else has devoted his life to the awakening of his, of our nation in writing, poetry, thought and finally in the deed.
Incredibly, it still remains in his hometown. Hitler was here on October 29, 1933 where he spoke at its unveiling. Eckart's 1925 unfinished essay Hitler-Eckart: Der Bolschewismus von Moses bis Lenin: Zwiegespräch zwischen Hitler und mir ( Bolshevism from Moses to Lenin: Dialogues Between Hitler and Me") was published posthumously, although it has been shown that the dialogues were an invention.

Hitler visiting the town
Nazi propaganda over Untere Marktstraße and today
March by the Reichsarbeitsdienst, looking the other way on Obere Marktstraße
The Gasthaus Zum Hechten at Untere Marktstraße 3; today the building appears to have been completed replaced. Not surprising given the damage the town received during the war:
 
The Unteres Tor during the war and as it appears today

Obere Marktstraße-Klostergasse with the church still in the background

The rathaus in 1935, after the war and as it appears today

The railway station during the Third Reich and now

 
The Sparkasse then and now


Waldmünchen
Adolf-Hitler-Platz then and now


Kemnath
 24 km southeast of Bayreuth is this town, shown when its high street was 'Adolf-Hitler-Strasse' and today.

 Wörishofen 

 Geromillerhaus after a plane crash, with American troops marching past after the war, and today

Eichstätt
This Hitler Jugend haus, completed in 1938, is still a Youth Hostel. 
 Whilst the marktplatz and its fountain has survived the war, in large part thanks to the town's youth:  "The brave boys instantly got their hoses and connected to the water, and it was a real pleasure to see the Pimpfe and Hitler-Jungen rush to the fire" according to the Eichstätter Heimatzeitung on March 13, 1943. Already in July 1940 the party announced: "7000 Hitler Youth are under the fireman's helmet." The average age was 16 years. The training lasted for six months, and the youth learned to operate all fire equipment, "so that they can collaborate with experienced firefighters at each deployment."
 
 
The remains of the Eichstätt Thingstätte, built 1935
video
Nazikult in Eichstätt- Die Geschichte der Thingstätte   
Weilheim
 
Adolf-Hitler-Platz then and now 
NS-Kreistag at the site on June 16, 1938 showing from the left NS-Kreisleiter Hausböck (Garmisch-Partenkirchen, NS-Kreisleiter Dennerl (Weilheim), Stellv. Gauleiter Nippold and Gauleiter Wagner. 

 
Otto Hoffmeister Haus, used as a youth hostel during the Third Reich 
 
The Vier-Jahreszeiten-Brunnen at the former Adolf-Hitler-Platz and today

Ellingen

 The schloss from a 1944 postcard and today
 
The Schlosskirche after the war with an American GI surveying the looted art recovered from the Nazis, and today
 
The rathaus

Grafenwöhr 
 
Around June 25 1938, Hitler attended manoeuvres on the training grounds at Grafenwöhr, close to the Czechoslovakian border, where American paratroopers assigned to Destined Company, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne) took part in a military exercise on February 1, 2014.  
 
The water tower on Truppenübungsplatz in 1935 and today



The rathaus in the period photo bears the sign "Grafenwöhr grüßt die siegreichen Truppen"- Grafenwöhr greets its richly-honoured troops

Günzburg
Adolf-Hitler-Platz then and now. Hitler himself had, on October 11 1932, launched a speechmaking campaign comparable in magnitude to his “Flights over Germany” here where he declared
Herr von Papen was of the conviction that his emergency decree for the stimulation of the economy would bring brilliant results by November 6, and thus he scheduled the date for the Reichstag election sixty days after its dissolution. And I was of the conviction that the nation would see in these sixty days that this effort at “stimulating the economy” was the greatest feat of bungling and patchwork one can imagine. I was of the conviction that one question would be answered before even four weeks had passed, namely the question why I refused to enter this Cabinet on August 13. This will be decided on November.

It was not, however, the opponents in question who reproached me for refusing to join the Cabinet; it was the so-called “friends” in the bourgeois camp. At this point, I might ask with the same justification: how was it that you dared to invite me to join this Government?

Did you really believe that I worked for thirteen years to deliver the result of this work to the mercy of political lunacy? And it would have been lunacy had I staked everything on one horse, long aware that it was unfit for the race. Influence was one thing I would not have had in the Cabinet, but the responsibility was something they would have graciously surrendered.

I have no qualms about assuming the responsibility, and I mean the entire responsibility, but I do have qualms about assuming it in areas where I have no influence. If Fate had chosen those forces which today thirst for power to be Germany’s leadership, it would be a crime to resist. However, I do not believe that Fate could have chosen these men, because otherwise they would have made an appearance earlier. It is not possible for someone who was a silent member of the Centre Party until five months ago to then one day suddenly become the “brightly enlightened leader” to the Third Reich. I did not fight Marxism in order to erect a different class regime in its place. I have stood before millions of German workers in these thirteen years and have struggled for their support. But I did not fight to betray them now in the end.

Above all, my opponents are mistaken about my tremendous resolve. I have chosen my path, and I will adhere to it until the end. Whether or not I gain power is not as important as the fact that I carry out what I have promised. Similarly, the Party is not for sale and cannot be bought from me. Do not make the mistake of believing that I would lend out this Movement even for a second or allow others to use it for their work.

Adolf-Hitler-Strasse then and now
This was the hometown of Nazi politician Franz Xaver Schwarz and the "angel of death" Josef Mengele, SS officer and Auschwitz physician.
The town's memorial to the victims of the concentration camp doctor Josef Mengele, composed of a display board around which single eyes (around 50 created by pupils from Dossenberger-Gymnasium) and pairs of eyes (around 25 by the 6th form art foundation course pupils from Maria-Ward-Gymnasium) are grouped. The single eyes and pairs of eyes were modelled from clay in lessons and baked after air drying. From the “clay eyes”, the foundry finished the final step of making silicon formed wax models, through the manufacturing of moulds. The memorial was unveiled on the 8th March 2005. According to Mengele's son Rolf, his father returned to the Gunzburg area toward the end of 1948 and stayed in the nearby forests until the spring of 1949. Mengele told Irene that he expected her and Rolf to follow once he had established himself in Buenos Aires. But Irene would not agree to go with him. Mengele's flight was arranged and paid for by his family through former SS contacts in the Gunzburg area. 

This was a town that had driven out its 309 resident Jews after the Nazis came to power. There was a widespread readiness to believe that the allegations against Mengele were false. And broadcasts across Germany by the overseas service of the BBC claiming that the SS had engaged in monstrous acts of carnage, were viewed as Allied victory propaganda.

 From an article by noted plagiarist Gerald L. Posner and John Ware, Chicago Tribune Magazine, May 18, 1986
 The Frauenkirche then and now
 Standing together in defiance, 100,000 people gather across France to show support for 12 people slaughtered by 'Al Qaeda' gunmen in attack on Paris magazine as manhunt for terrorists continues      Masked gunmen storm Paris headquarters with AK-47s shouting 'Allahu akbar!' and 'the Prophet has been avenged'     Stalked building asking for people's names before killing the editor, three cartoonists and the deputy chief editor     Editor Stephane Charbonnier had famously shrugged off threats, saying: 'I'd rather die standing than live kneeling'     Horrific footage shows a police officer begging for his life before being shot in the head at point-blank range     Cartoonist Corrine Rey told how she cowered with her young daughter as she watched two colleagues gunned down     Killers fled in stolen car across eastern Paris after a 'mass shoot-out' with police officers and remain on the loose       Militants believed to be from Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula which was behind plane bomb plots in US and UK     Three suspects said to be all French citizens - a homeless teenage man aged 18, and two brothers aged 32 and 34     Newspaper had earlier posted a picture of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi on its Twitter account     Publication's offices were firebombed in 2011 for publishing satirical cartoon of Prophet Mohammed     White House had previously criticised Charlie Hebdo in 2012 for publishing its religiously sensitive cartoons  By Mark Duell and Simon Tomlinson and Peter Allen and Jay Akbar and Chris Pleasance for MailOnline  Published: 11:16 GMT, 7 January 2015 | Updated: 20:50 GMT, 7 January 2015  12k shares  5.3k  View comments  At least 100,000 people gathered across France tonight to back an anti-Islamist newspaper whose offices were devastated by a deadly terrorist attack.  Suspected Al Qaeda militants massacred 12 people in Paris today - and among those slaughtered was a police officer as he begged for mercy.   Tonight, thousands of people went to Republique Square near the scene to honour the victims, holding signs reading 'Je suis Charlie' - 'I am Charlie'.  It came as a massive manhunt was launched to find the masked attackers, who earlier burst into the Charlie Hebdo offices brandishing Kalashnikovs.   Clad all in black with hoods and speaking French, the militants forced one of the cartoonists - at the office with her young daughter - to open the door.  Witnesses said the gunmen shouted 'we are from the Al Qaeda in Yemen', and 'Allahu akbar!' - Arabic for 'God is great' - as they stalked the building.   Scroll down for videos and audio  Demonstration: Protesters at the Place de la Republique in Paris tonight, following an attack by gunmen on the offices of Charlie Hebdo +38  Demonstration: Protesters at the Place de la Republique in Paris tonight, following an attack by gunmen on the offices of Charlie Hebdo Elsewhere: People gather at the Place Royale in Nantes to show their solidarity for the victims of the attack on the offices of the satirical weekly  Elsewhere: People gather at the Place Royale in Nantes to show their solidarity for the victims of the attack on the offices of the satirical weekly Brutal execution: A police officer pleads for mercy on the pavement in Paris before being shot in the head by masked gunmen during an attack on the headquarters of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo, a notoriously anti-Islamic publication  Brutal execution: A police officer pleads for mercy on the pavement in Paris before being shot in the head by masked gunmen during an attack on the headquarters of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo, a notoriously anti-Islamic publication Gunned down in cold blood: Horrific footage shows the injured police officer slumped on the pavement as two of the gunmen approach. In a desperate plea for his life, the officer slowly raises his hand towards one of the attackers, who callously shoots him at point-blank range  Gunned down in cold blood: Horrific footage shows the injured police officer slumped on the pavement as two of the gunmen approach. In a desperate plea for his life, the officer slowly raises his hand towards one of the attackers, who callously shoots him at point-blank range 'Massacre': The gunmen are seen brandishing Kalashnikovs as they move in on the injured police officer from their vehicle outside the office  'Massacre': The gunmen are seen brandishing Kalashnikovs as they move in on the injured police officer from their vehicle outside the office  They were also said to have yelled 'the Prophet has been avenged', during what was France's deadliest post-war terrorist attack.  The attackers headed straight for the paper's editor and cartoonist, Stephane Charbonnier, killing him and his police bodyguard.  The security had been recruited to protect him after extremists firebombed the offices in 2011 over a satirical cartoon about the Prophet Mohammed.  A year later, Mr Charbonnier famously dismissed threats against his life, declaring: 'I would rather die standing than live kneeling.'  The militants also killed three other renowned cartoonists – men who had regularly satirised Islam – and the newspaper's deputy chief editor. RELATED ARTICLES      Previous     1     2     Next      'I prefer to die than live like a rat': Bravery of slain... Crowds gather in central Paris in solidarity with murdered... Standing together in defiance, thousands gather across... epa04549963 British Prime Minister David Cameron (L) with German Chancellor Angela Merkel (R), during a press conference at 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, 07 January 2015. During her visit to London the two leaders are expected to discuss the economy and EU reforms. EPA/ANDY RAIN Merkel and Cameron given extraordinary joint terror briefing... #JeSuisCharlie sweeps Twitter as Internet users rush to show... A French soldier patrols in front of the Eiffel Tower on January 7, 2015 in Paris as the capital was placed under the highest alert status after heavily armed gunmen shouting Islamist slogans stormed French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and shot dead at least 12 people in the deadliest attack in France in four decades. Police launched a massive manhunt for the masked attackers who reportedly hijacked a car and sped off, running over a pedestrian and shooting at officers. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGETJOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images Soldiers on the streets: Military is brought in to protect...     Obama condemns 'cowardly evil' attack on French newspaper... Charlie Hebdo cartoonist reveals terrorists threatened to... Charlie Hebdo France shooting cartoonist Shooting at headquarters of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris Were they militarily trained? Terrifying footage shows how... Ian Hislop, Editor of Private Eye magazine is reflected in a glass cabinet as he stands in front of a wall of the magazine's front covers, at the V&A Museum, in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. A display to celebrate the magazine's first 50 years is open to the public on Oct. 18 until Jan. 2012. The display shows a collection of drawings, caricatures, cartoons and has a recreation of the magazine's editor's office. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth) 'Very little seems funny today': Private Eye editor Ian...  Share this article Share 12k shares  Despite a shoot-out with armed officers, the gunmen escaped in a hijacked car and remained on the loose this evening.  This left the French capital in virtual lockdown as police and soldiers flooded the streets to join the search.  The three suspects were tonight said by Metronews to be all French citizens - a homeless teenage man aged 18, and two brothers aged 32 and 34.   President Barack Obama offered U.S. help in pursuing the gunmen, saying they had attacked freedom of expression.  But it also emerged that the White House had previously criticised Charlie Hebdo in 2012 over its Prophet Mohammed cartoon.  At the time it had said that the images would be 'deeply offensive to many and have the potential to be inflammatory'. Packed: Protesters gather during a demonstration at the Old Port of Marseille, southern France, after the shooting in Paris  Packed: Protesters gather during a demonstration at the Old Port of Marseille, southern France, after the shooting in Paris Standing together: People hold up pens and posters reading 'I am Charlie' in French as they take part in a vigil in Trafalgar Square, London  Standing together: People hold up pens and posters reading 'I am Charlie' in French as they take part in a vigil in Trafalgar Square, London In Germany: People mourn the victims in front of the Brandenburg Gate (centre, background) near the French embassy at Pariser Platz, Berlin  In Germany: People mourn the victims in front of the Brandenburg Gate (centre, background) near the French embassy at Pariser Platz, Berlin Gathering: A person holds a placard reading 'I am Charlie' in Clermont-Ferrand, central France, today during a rally in support of the victims  Gathering: A person holds a placard reading 'I am Charlie' in Clermont-Ferrand, central France, today during a rally in support of the victims  Emergency: Police officers and firefighters gather in front of the offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris today after gunmen stormed the building  Emergency: Police officers and firefighters gather in front of the offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris today after gunmen stormed the building  Critical: Firefighters carry an injured man on a stretcher in front of the offices of French satirical paper Charlie Hebdo after the shooting  Critical: Firefighters carry an injured man on a stretcher in front of the offices of French satirical paper Charlie Hebdo after the shooting Faces of the victims: Among the journalists killed were (l to r) Charlie Hebdo's deputy chief editor Bernard Maris and cartoonists Georges Wolinski, Jean Cabut, aka Cabu, Stephane Charbonnier, who is also editor-in-chief, and Bernard Verlhac, also known as Tignous  Faces of the victims: Among the journalists killed were (l to r) Charlie Hebdo's deputy chief editor Bernard Maris and cartoonists Georges Wolinski, Jean Cabut, aka Cabu, Stephane Charbonnier, who is also editor-in-chief, and Bernard Verlhac, also known as Tignous Crowds of Parisians gather in homage to shooting victims more videos      1     2     3     4          Watch video          Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down...         Watch video          Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris         Watch video          Adorable moment twin babies lock eyes for the first time         Watch video          Moment off-duty cop accidentally shoots himself in front of...         Watch video          Argie-bhaji: Chaotic brawl in curry house caught on camera         Watch video          Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris...         Watch video          Kai the abandoned dog settles in at rehoming centre         Watch video          Unbelievable moment car drives WRONG WAY round roundabout         Watch video          Security tight in Cairo for Orthordox Christmas celebrations         Watch video          Cat thoroughly unimpressed as Bulldog puppy drags her bed         Watch video          The shocking moment a cameraman is hit by a Ducati motorbike         Watch video          Skydivers lucky to be alive after emergency landing on beach  Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down police more videos      1     2     3     4          Watch video          Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down...         Watch video          Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris         Watch video          Adorable moment twin babies lock eyes for the first time         Watch video          Moment off-duty cop accidentally shoots himself in front of...         Watch video          Argie-bhaji: Chaotic brawl in curry house caught on camera         Watch video          Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris...         Watch video          Kai the abandoned dog settles in at rehoming centre         Watch video          Unbelievable moment car drives WRONG WAY round roundabout         Watch video          Security tight in Cairo for Orthordox Christmas celebrations         Watch video          Cat thoroughly unimpressed as Bulldog puppy drags her bed         Watch video          The shocking moment a cameraman is hit by a Ducati motorbike         Watch video          Skydivers lucky to be alive after emergency landing on beach  Meanwhile, horrific footage emerged showing an injured police officer slumped on the pavement as two gunmen approached him outside the office.  In an apparent desperate plea for life, the officer is seen slowly raising his hand towards an attacker, who shoots him in the head at point-blank range.  Despite a fierce firefight with police, the men got away in a hijacked car, and, within an hour of the atrocity, appeared to have vanished without trace.  France raised its security alert to the highest level and reinforced protective measures at houses of worship, stores, media offices and transportation.    President Francois Hollande called the bloodbath a 'barbaric attack against France and against journalists' and vowed to hunt down those responsible.  Jacques Myard, French MP with opposition party UMP (Union for a Popular Movement), said: 'We knew something would happen.   'The (security) services used to say to us it's not if but when and where. We know that we are at war.   'The Western nations - like Britain, France, Germany - we are at war.'   The Queen today sent her 'sincere condolences to the families of those who have been killed' in the attack.  And Prime Minister David Cameron described the murders as 'sickening'.   Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris offices more videos      1     2     3     4          Watch video          Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down...         Watch video          Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris         Watch video          Adorable moment twin babies lock eyes for the first time         Watch video          Moment off-duty cop accidentally shoots himself in front of...         Watch video          Argie-bhaji: Chaotic brawl in curry house caught on camera         Watch video          Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris...         Watch video          Kai the abandoned dog settles in at rehoming centre         Watch video          Unbelievable moment car drives WRONG WAY round roundabout         Watch video          Security tight in Cairo for Orthordox Christmas celebrations         Watch video          Cat thoroughly unimpressed as Bulldog puppy drags her bed         Watch video          The shocking moment a cameraman is hit by a Ducati motorbike         Watch video          Skydivers lucky to be alive after emergency landing on beach  At large: The gunmen are seen near the offices of the French newspaper Charlie Hebdo before fleeing in a car. They remain on the loose  At large: The gunmen are seen near the offices of the French newspaper Charlie Hebdo before fleeing in a car. They remain on the loose Forensic experts examine the car believed to have been used as the escape vehicle by gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo office  Forensic experts examine the car believed to have been used as the escape vehicle by gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo office A truck tows the car apprently used by armed gunmen who stormed the Paris offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 people  A truck tows the car apprently used by armed gunmen who stormed the Paris offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 people  Twitter users responded to the Charlie Hebdo massacre with an outpouring of solidarity using the hashtag #jesuischarlie, which is trending online.  By 4.15pm, nearly five hours after the attack, it had already been tweeted more than 250,000 times, according to one social analytics website.   Guy Verhofstadt, the President of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe tweeted: 'A tragic day for the freedom of speech #jesuischarlie.'   Marches have also been organised through Paris and London in support of journalistic freedom.  As well as the AK47 assault rifles, there were also reports of a rocket-propelled grenade being used in the attack.  It took place during the publication's weekly editorial meeting at around 12pm (11am GMT), meaning all the journalists would have been present.  A young mother and cartoonist, known as 'Coco', who survived the massacre told how she had let the suspected Al Qaeda killers into the office.  Corrine Rey said she had returned from picking up her daughter from a nursery when she was confronted by two armed men wearing balaclavas.  'I had gone to pick up my daughter at day care, arriving in front of the building, where two masked and armed men brutally threatened us,' said Ms Rey.  'They said they wanted to go up to the offices, so I tapped in the code,' said Ms Rey, referring to the digi-code security system on the interphone.   A police photographer (partially hidden) works with investigators as they examine the impacts from machine gun fire on a police vehicle  A police photographer (partially hidden) works with investigators as they examine the impacts from machine gun fire on a police vehicle A man is carried into an ambulance. Ten people were reportedly in wounded, four critically, in the attack by suspected Al Qaeda militants  A man is carried into an ambulance. Ten people were reportedly in wounded, four critically, in the attack by suspected Al Qaeda militants Life-threatening: An injured person is evacuated outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office  Life-threatening: An injured person is evacuated outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office  Ms Rey and her daughter hid under a desk, from where they saw two other cartoonists being executed.   'They shot Wolinski and Cabu,' she said. 'It lasted five minutes. I had taken refuge under a desk.'   Ms Rey said the men 'spoke French perfectly' and 'claimed they were 'Al Qaeda terrorists'.   Gunmen reportedly told another witness: 'You say to the media, it was Al Qaeda in Yemen.'    A police source told the Liberation newspaper the gunmen were asking for the Mr Charbonnier by name, shouting: 'Where is Charb? Where is Charb?'  The source added: 'They killed him then sprayed everyone else.'  Mr Charbonnier was included in a 2013 'Wanted Dead or Alive for Crimes Against Islam' article published by Al Qaeda propaganda magazine Inspire.  The latest tweet published by the newspaper's official Twitter account earlier in the day featured a cartoon of Abu Baghdadi, the leader of Islamic State.  In it, he wishes everyone 'good health'. Cartoonists Cabu, Tignous and Wolinski were all also reported dead.   Radio France chief executive Mathieu Gilet later announced on Twitter that a contributor, Bernard Maris, was another of the victims.     Several people were left critically wounded when terrorists carried out a ‘military-style’ attack on the newspaper office  Several people were left critically wounded when terrorists carried out a 'military-style' attack on the newspaper office Shell-shocked: A woman cries outside the office. Witnesses reported hearing loud gunfire and at least one explosion during the attack  Shell-shocked: A woman cries outside the office. Witnesses reported hearing loud gunfire and at least one explosion during the attack Trail of destruction: Police inspect the damage after a collision between police cars at the scene during a firefight with Islamic militants  Trail of destruction: Police inspect the damage after a collision between police cars at the scene during a firefight with Islamic militants  Meanwhile, there were reports of a car explosion outside a synagogue in Sarcelles, in northern Paris, just hours after the Charlie Hebdo attack.  The blast, at about 1.30pm GMT, is not thought to be connected to the massacre, according to Paris Metro which quoted the mayor of Sarcelles.  Florence Pouvil, a saleswoman at Lunas France on Rue Nicolas Appert, opposite the Charlie Hebdo offices, spoke of her shock at the attack.  She told MailOnline: 'I saw two people with big guns, like Kalashnikovs outside our office and then we heard firing. We were very confused.  'There were two guys who came out of the building and shot everywhere. We hid on the floor, we were terrified.   'They came from the building opposite with big guns. It has a bunch of different companies inside.   'Some of our co-workers work there so we were frightened for them. They weren't just firing inside the Charlie Hebdo offices.   'They were firing in the street too.  We feared for our lives so we hid under our desks so they wouldn't see us.   'Both men were dressed in black from head to toe and their faces were covered so I didn't see them.   'They were wearing military clothes, it wasn't common clothing, like they were soldiers.'    ARE PARIS GUNMEN FROM YEMENI AL QAEDA CELL BEHIND PLANE BOMB PLOTS IN THE U.S. AND BRITAIN?  The gunmen being hunted by police over the Charlie Hebdo attack are believed to be from militant group Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP).  The group was established by Yusef al-Ayeri in 2003 in Saudi Arabia, but was forced to flee to Yemen after a series of attacks drove them back.  Yemen's weak government allowed the group to rally and gain members, though they are only thought to have around 400 troops today.  While their attacks initially focused on targets in the Middle East, such as an attempted suicide attack on Saudi Minister Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, they quickly spread to Western targets.  On Christmas Day in 2009, they were implicated in the underwear bomb plot after Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab was discovered on a Detroit-bound plane trying to detonate liquid explosives in his underpants.  The following year AQAP also took responsibility for a plot to blow up two devices hidden inside printer cartridges loaded on to cargo planes travelling from Yemen to the United States.  One device was discovered during a stopover at East Midlands Airport in Britain, while another was uncovered in Dubai.  According to Stanford University the group is currently lead by Yemen-born Nasser al-Wuhayshi, who is an apprentice of Osama Bin Laden and was imprisoned for a time in Yemen, but escaped in 2006 along with 22 others.  The group has a global jihadist agenda. Like ISIS, they aim to create a single Arab caliphate, covering Pakistan Afghanistan, Iraq, Yemen and the Levant - the area encompassing Lebanon, Jordan, Syria and Israel.  If today's attack is confirmed as coming from AQAP, it will be the first time the group has used lone-wolf style tactics, in which gunmen act alone or in small groups to attack targets.  Officers were involved in a gunfight with the men, who escaped in a hijacked car and sped away from the office towards east Paris  Officers were involved in a gunfight with the men, who escaped in a hijacked car and sped away from the office towards east Paris On red alert: After the first shots rang out, it is thought that three policemen on bicycles were the first to respond to the atrocity   On red alert: After the first shots rang out, it is thought that three policemen on bicycles were the first to respond to the atrocity  Benoit Bringer, a journalist with Agence Premiere Ligne, told the iTele network he saw several masked men armed with machine guns  Benoit Bringer, a journalist with Agence Premiere Ligne, told the iTele network he saw several masked men armed with machine guns  Carnage: A police official, Luc Poignant, said he was aware of one journalist dead and several injured, including three police officers  Carnage: A police official, Luc Poignant, said he was aware of one journalist dead and several injured, including three police officers  The New York Times reported that a journalist at the Charlie Hebdo office, who asked not to be named, texted a friend after the attack to say: 'I'm alive.  'There is death all around me. Yes, I am there. The jihadists spared me.'  Another witness, Gilles Boulanger, who works in the same building, told Itele: 'A neighbour called to warn me that there were armed men in the building and that we had to shut all the doors.  'And several minutes later, there were several shots heard in the building from automatic weapons firing in all directions.   'So then we looked out of the window and saw the shooting was on Boulevard Richard-Lenoir, with the police. It was really upsetting. You'd think it was a war zone.'   French journalist, Stefan De Vries, told Sky News: 'There was protection at the door but they killed the police officers, they executed them and they started shooting in the offices.'  An unnamed eyewitness told the BBC World Service: 'When I arrived at the scene it was quite disturbing as you can imagine. There were several corpses on the floor.  'We saw the number of casualties was very high, so we just tried to help as we could - there were a lot of people down on the floor and there was blood everywhere.  'I'm very traumatised by this attack and everything and now we're in psychological hell where we're being attended to by professionals.'  Terror: In footage filmed from a rooftop, people are seen running for cover as the gunmen rampage through the building  Terror: In footage filmed from a rooftop, people are seen running for cover as the gunmen rampage through the building A picture posted on Twitter appearing to show people taking refuge on the roof of the Charlie Hebdo office  A picture posted on Twitter appearing to show people taking refuge on the roof of the Charlie Hebdo office Targeted: A picture posted on Twitter reportedly showing bullets in one of the windows of the Charlie Hebdo offices  Targeted: A picture posted on Twitter reportedly showing bullets in one of the windows of the Charlie Hebdo offices  Benoit Bringer, a journalist at the scene who works next door, took refuge on the roof of the building, which is in the 11th arrondissement of Paris.   He said: 'There were very many people in the building. We evacuated via the roof just next to the office. After around ten minutes we saw two heavily armed, masked men in the street'.  Another witness said: 'There was a loud gunfire and at least one explosion. When police arrived there was a mass shoot-out. The men got away by car, stealing a car.'  A police official, Luc Poignant, said: 'It's carnage.'   After the shooting, hundreds of comments were posted on the Charlie Hebdo Twitter page, with one user, David Rault, writing: 'A sad day for freedom of expression.'   Charlie Hebdo's editor-in-chief Gerard Biard escaped the massacre because he was in London.  He told France Inter: 'I am shocked that people can have attacked a newspaper in France, a secular republic. I don't understand it.  'I don't understand how people can attack a newspaper with heavy weapons. A newspaper is not a weapon of war.'  Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris more videos      1     2     3     4          Watch video          Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down...         Watch video          Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris         Watch video          Adorable moment twin babies lock eyes for the first time         Watch video          Moment off-duty cop accidentally shoots himself in front of...         Watch video          Argie-bhaji: Chaotic brawl in curry house caught on camera         Watch video          Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris...         Watch video          Kai the abandoned dog settles in at rehoming centre         Watch video          Unbelievable moment car drives WRONG WAY round roundabout         Watch video          Security tight in Cairo for Orthordox Christmas celebrations         Watch video          Cat thoroughly unimpressed as Bulldog puppy drags her bed         Watch video          The shocking moment a cameraman is hit by a Ducati motorbike         Watch video          Skydivers lucky to be alive after emergency landing on beach  High alert: French soldiers patrol at the Eiffel Tower after the Charlie Hebdo shooting as the militants are hunted across the city  High alert: French soldiers patrol at the Eiffel Tower after the Charlie Hebdo shooting as the militants are hunted across the city French soldiers patrol at the Eiffel Tower after a shooting at a French satirical newspaper, in Paris, France, Wednesday, Jan. 7 A French soldier patrols in front of the Eiffel Tower on January 7, 2015 in Paris as the capital was placed under the highest alert status after heavily armed gunmen shouting Islamist slogans stormed French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and shot dead at least 12 people in the deadliest attack in France in four decades. Police launched a massive manhunt for the masked attackers who reportedly hijacked a car and sped off, running over a pedestrian and shooting at officers. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGETJOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images  France reinforced security at houses of worship, stores, media offices and transport after masked gunmen stormed the Charlie Hebdo offices  Mr Biard said he did not believe the attack was linked to the newspaper's latest front page, which featured novelist Michel Houellebecq, who has previously sparked controversy with comments about Islam.  And he said the newspaper had not received threats of violence: 'Not to my knowledge, and I don't think anyone had received them as individuals, because they would have talked about it. There was no particular tension at the moment.'   A visibly shocked French President François Hollande, speaking live near the scene of the shooting, said: 'France is today in shock, in front of a terrorist attack.  'This newspaper was threatened several rimes in the past and we need to show we are a united country.  'We have to be firm, and we have to be stand strong with the international community in the coming days and weeks.  'We are at a very difficult moment following several terrorist attacks. We are threated because we are a country of freedom  'We will punish the attackers. We will look for the people responsible.'   Today, Mr Cameron said: 'We stand with the French people in the fight against terror and defending the freedom of the press.'   US President Barack Obama has condemned the 'horrific shooting', offering to provide any assistance needed 'to help bring these terrorists to justice'.  And United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said: 'It was a horrendous, unjustifiable and cold-blooded crime.   'It was also a direct assault on a cornerstone of democracy, on the media and on freedom of expression.'  The British Foreign Office immediately updated is advice for travellers heading to Pairs, warning: 'There is a high threat from terrorism.'  Defiant: Stephane Charbonnier, known by his pen name Charb, was editor of Charlie Hebdo, and gunned down by men with assault weapons  Defiant: Stephane Charbonnier, known by his pen name Charb, was editor of Charlie Hebdo, and gunned down by men with assault weapons  Mr Charbonnier was named as one of nine men the extreme Islamist group were targetting (pictured centre right). Their photographs were printed alongside the caption 'a bullet a day keeps the infidel away' Tragic: Cartoonist Georges Wolinski was named by officials as one of those shot dead at the offices of Charlie Hebdo  Tragic: Cartoonist Georges Wolinski was named by officials as one of those shot dead at the offices of Charlie Hebdo Cartoonist Cabu Bernard 'Tignous' Verlhac was gunned down by terrorists today  Lead cartoonist Jean 'Cabu' Cabut (left) was among the 12 massacred by terrorists in Paris today, along with Bernard 'Tignous' Verlhac (right)  Radio France chief executive Mathieu Gilet announced on Twitter that a contributor, Bernard Maris (above right) was another of the victims  Radio France chief executive Mathieu Gilet announced on Twitter that a contributor, Bernard Maris (above right) was another of the victims Committee to Protect Journalists reacts to Paris attack more videos      1     2     3     4          Watch video          Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down...         Watch video          Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris         Watch video          Adorable moment twin babies lock eyes for the first time         Watch video          Moment off-duty cop accidentally shoots himself in front of...         Watch video          Argie-bhaji: Chaotic brawl in curry house caught on camera         Watch video          Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris...         Watch video          Kai the abandoned dog settles in at rehoming centre         Watch video          Unbelievable moment car drives WRONG WAY round roundabout         Watch video          Security tight in Cairo for Orthordox Christmas celebrations         Watch video          Cat thoroughly unimpressed as Bulldog puppy drags her bed         Watch video          The shocking moment a cameraman is hit by a Ducati motorbike         Watch video          Skydivers lucky to be alive after emergency landing on beach  It added: 'If you're in Paris or the Ile de France area take extra care and follow advice of French authorities.'    Luce Lapin and Laurent Leger, who have both worked at Charlie Hebdo, were using Twitter hours before the attack, with the most recent tweet posted by Lapin praising cartoonist Cabu.  It read: 'Cabu, a great man! And honest, he doesn't eat foie gras.'   While Leger's made a political point about taxes.   It said: 'Macron [French ministry of economy] wants more billionaires in France, the same that use tricks for not paying ISF [solidarity tax on wealth].'   Mohammed Moussaoui, president of the Union of French mosques, condemned the 'hateful act,' and urged Muslims and Christians 'to intensify their actions to give more strength to this dialogue to make a united front against extremism'.   It is believed to be the deadliest attack in France since 1961, when right-wingers who wanted to keep Algeria French bombed a train, killing 28 people.  The number of attackers was initially reported to be two, but the French Interior Minister later said security services were hunting three 'criminals'.  Bernard Cazeneuve added that Paris had been placed on the highest alert.  Security expert Professor Anthony Glees, from the University of Buckingham, said: ‘The French have signally failed to keep their country safe.’  He told MailOnline: ‘We in the great western democracies could now be on the verge of a sustained series of Al-Qaeda-IS attacks, generated by the hold that Islamists have in many places in the world, not least the IS state itself.   ‘We cannot appease this movement - we have to win the security war against it and contain it, otherwise big trouble lies ahead.  David Cameron condemns barbaric gun attack in Paris more videos      1     2     3     4          Watch video          Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down...         Watch video          Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris         Watch video          Adorable moment twin babies lock eyes for the first time         Watch video          Moment off-duty cop accidentally shoots himself in front of...         Watch video          Argie-bhaji: Chaotic brawl in curry house caught on camera         Watch video          Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris...         Watch video          Kai the abandoned dog settles in at rehoming centre         Watch video          Unbelievable moment car drives WRONG WAY round roundabout         Watch video          Security tight in Cairo for Orthordox Christmas celebrations         Watch video          Cat thoroughly unimpressed as Bulldog puppy drags her bed         Watch video          The shocking moment a cameraman is hit by a Ducati motorbike         Watch video          Skydivers lucky to be alive after emergency landing on beach  Location: Officers were involved in a gunfight with the men, who escaped in a hijacked car and sped away from the office towards east Paris 'We have to be stand strong with the international community': A visibly shocked French President François Hollande arrives at the scene, where he promised to bring those responsible to justice  'We have to be stand strong with the international community': A visibly shocked French President François Hollande arrives at the scene, where he promised to bring those responsible to justice '100 LASHES IF YOU DON'T DIE OF LAUGHTER': HOW CHARLIE HEBDO HAS BECOME A BYWORD FOR ANTI-ISLAMISM  Charlie Hebdo has become a byword for offensive statements in France after taking several highly provocative swipes at Islam.  The newspaper once named Prophet Mohammed as its guest editor, published cartoons of the holy figure in the nude, and once renamed itself Sharia Hebdo with the cover slogan '100 lashes if you don't die of laughter'.  The controversy began in 2006 when the publication reprinted now-infamous cartoons of Prophet Mohammed by Danish artist Kurt Westergaard.  When the images originally appeared they lead to days of protests across the Middle East and in Western cities. The decision to reprint the images landed the then-editor in court under anti-terror laws, though he was later acquitted.  The Hebdo offices were burned to the ground in 2011 when attackers used Molotov cocktails to start a blaze early in the morning of November 2.  There was nobody in the building at the time, and the target was instead thought to be the newspaper's computer system, which was completely destroyed.  Riot police were forced to stand guard outside the building for days following the attack, as the editors took a defiant stance, choosing to reprint the cartoon images multiple times.  In 2012 they again printed cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed as a deliberately provocative gesture while violent protests were taking place across the Middle East.  The following year the newspaper's office again had to be surrounded by riot officers after they published a cartoon booklet depicting the Prohpet naked as a baby and being pushed in a wheelchair.  On the final page of the booklet there was a note from the editor, Stephane Charbonnier, saying the images were 'halal' because Muslims had worked on them, and that they were factually accurate as they had been derived from descriptions in the Koran.  The satirical publication, widely seen as France's answer to Private Eye, prides itself on a mixture of tongue-in-cheek reporting and investigative journalism.   Hebdo's current office building has no notices on the door to prevent a repeat of the attacks that have occurred in the past.  In an interview with De Volkskrant in January 2013, Mr Charbonnier revealed he had been placed under constant police protection for four months after one of the cartoon issues was published.  He shrugged off criticism that he was only publishing the images to gain notoriety for Hebdo, and insisted that he was instead defending the right to free speech.  Mr Charbonnier pointed out that the newspaper had poked fun at feminism, nuclear energy and homeland security, but the Islam issues always attracted the most publicity.  Charlie Hebdo was previously attacked with a firebomb in 2011 more videos      1     2     3     4          Watch video          Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down...         Watch video          Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris         Watch video          Adorable moment twin babies lock eyes for the first time         Watch video          Moment off-duty cop accidentally shoots himself in front of...         Watch video          Argie-bhaji: Chaotic brawl in curry house caught on camera         Watch video          Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris...         Watch video          Kai the abandoned dog settles in at rehoming centre         Watch video          Unbelievable moment car drives WRONG WAY round roundabout         Watch video          Security tight in Cairo for Orthordox Christmas celebrations         Watch video          Cat thoroughly unimpressed as Bulldog puppy drags her bed         Watch video          The shocking moment a cameraman is hit by a Ducati motorbike         Watch video          Skydivers lucky to be alive after emergency landing on beach  ‘We need more and better intelligence-led activity at home and we need to defeat the IS state abroad.  ‘It's not surprising that so many people in Europe are demonstrating against what they see as the Islamisation of Europe.  ‘However, their target should not be the vast majority of European Muslims who want nothing to do with Islamism, but the political movement it has produced.  ‘This isn't about religion or faith communities, it's about revolutionary politics and violence and only force can overcome it.’  The offices of the same newspaper were burnt down in a petrol attack in 2011 after running a magazine cover of the Prophet Mohammed as a cartoon character.  At the time, the editor-in-chief, Stephane Charbonnier, said Islam could not be excluded from freedom of the press.  He said: 'If we can poke fun at everything in France, if we can talk about anything in France apart from Islam or the consequences of Islamism, that is annoying.'   Mr Charbonnier, also known as Charb, said he did not see the attack on the newspaper as the work of French Muslims, but of what he called 'idiot extremists'.   The cover showed Mohammed saying: '100 lashes if you are not dying of laughter'.  This week's Charlie Hebdo also featured the author Houellebecq, whose new novel imagines Muslims taking over the French government in 2022.   Inside, there was an editorial, attributed to the Prophet Muhammad, and more cartoons - one showing the Prophet with a clown's red nose.   Depiction of the Prophet is strictly prohibited in Islam, but the newspaper denied it was trying to be provocative.  A firebomb attack gutted the headquarters of Charlie Hebdo in November 2011 after it put an image of the Prophet Mohammed on its cover.  HOW ATTACK ON CHARLIE HEBDO HQ UNFOLDED  10.28am - The satirical magazine updates its Twitter page with a cartoon of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. In it, he wishes everyone 'good health'.  10.57am - The AFP news agency reports shots have been fired at the French weekly magazine, on Boulevard Richard Lenoir.  11.17am - Eyewitness accounts emerge showing the immediate aftermath of the scene.  11.22am - AFP confirms the first death as a result of the shooting. Three minutes later it confirms the death toll has risen to 10.  11.31am - President Francois Hollande is en-route to visit the magazine's offices shortly, officials say  11.36am - The death toll is increased to 11 and then to 12.  11.46am - Paris is put on maximum alert following the attacks.  11.49am - Prime Minister David Cameron condemns the attack: 'The murders in Paris are sickening. We stand with the French people in the fight against terror and defending the freedom of the press.'  11.54am - Mr Hollande, in an address near the scene of the massacre, says the shooting was 'undoubtedly a terrorist attack'. He adds: 'We fight threats and we will punish the attackers.'  11.59am - The first tweet is posted containing the hashtag #JeSuisCharlie in solidarity with the victims, the magazine and its supporters.  12.26pm - French officials confirm gunmen who carried out the attack are still at large. At least two criminals are believed to be involved.  12.38pm - The White House condemns Paris attack in the 'strongest possible terms'.  1.30pm - AFP says dead include three cartoonists and editor-in-chief Stephane Charbonnier, known as Charb.  2.13pm - French internal minister Bernard Cazeneuve says 'three criminals' were involved in the attack. They remain at large.   Read more:      Attentat à Charlie Hebdo : les trois suspects ont été identifiés – metronews  Share or comment on this article      12k     shares      Blame the politicians who demand we tolerate the in...     by mouse 24147  by Taboola Sponsored Links What Did George Brown Do To Become One Of The Youngest UK Multimillionaires?Google Sniper 15 Celebrities Who Are Smart With Their Money…Here Is What (They) DidGoodTips4Wealth In Search of French Polynesia's Famous PearlsPaul Gauguin Cruises by AFAR 10 Most Beautiful Botanical Gardens in the WorldAmerikanki Now Anyone Can Build A Great Website (Even You!)Lifegooroo MOST WATCHED NEWS VIDEOS      Previous     1     2     Next      Terrifying video shows trained terrorists gunning down...     Harrowing Instagram video captures audio of gunfire in Paris     Adorable moment twin babies lock eyes for the first time     Moment off-duty cop accidentally shoots himself in front of...     Argie-bhaji: Chaotic brawl in curry house caught on camera     Terrifying sounds of gunshots from rooftop above Paris...     Kai the abandoned dog settles in at rehoming centre     Unbelievable moment car drives WRONG WAY round roundabout     Security tight in Cairo for Orthordox Christmas celebrations     Cat thoroughly unimpressed as Bulldog puppy drags her bed     The shocking moment a cameraman is hit by a Ducati motorbike     Skydivers lucky to be alive after emergency landing on beach      Standing together in defiance, 100,000 people gather across...     Death of a hero live on their mobile phones: Passersby...     Ched Evans WILL play again: Rapist footballer to be handed...     'We warned them': Shocking moment angry Mexican mob tired of...     Mother-of-two who lost her memory in boyfriend's brutal...     'I prefer to die than live like a rat': Defiance of slain...     Put your foot down: What Stephen Fry told his fiancé to do...     Pictured in its watery grave: Haunting first glimpse of...     Liverpool manager Brendan Rodgers and girlfriend join club's...     Charlie Hebdo cartoonist reveals terrorists threatened to...     Met office jetstream graphic Double trouble! TWO Atlantic storms to batter Britain with...     Store wars: Asda and Sainsbury's in £450m discounting battle...  MOST READ NEWS Previous Next      ●     ●  Comments (5364)  Share what you think      Newest     Oldest     Best rated     Worst rated   View all  The comments below have been moderated in advance.  Linda Taylor, Coventry, 12 minutes ago  Some commentators here suggest we should blame politicians for these types of appalling atrocities but in France and Britain and other democracies we elect our politicians. We, the people, decide who has the political power ... that is if we the people can be bothered to vote ... we know that turnouts are very low in most elections. Many, many people just couldn't be bothered to vote. The murders who committed these crimes do not support democracy or free speech. If we do not vote and engage in free speech then we shall end up with the kind of society enforced by the Taliban, ISIs and Al Qaeda. We, the people, must take responsibility for the kind of society we have. 4 72 Click to rate  Very old, Mondovi, 12 minutes ago  There are Islamic neighborhoods in Paris that police, which are usually unarmed, cannot go. That is crazy. That needs to be immediately addressed. This is where these terrorists can hole up. There should never be any area in any city that is off limits. The Obama administration has for years cowered to these animals. it is ok to trash Christians, but the WH decries trashing Islam. Why? This soft response is emboldening,these animals. 7 115 Click to rate  Vivelo, here, United Kingdom, 12 minutes ago  If people don't agree with our way of life, our freedom to express ourselves and our beliefs, why do they come here? Why do they read or watch our media? The people are right in saying we are being attacked. Yes we do interfere in other countries, but 9/10 its to either help the minority or majority of people who are being attacked in their own country. We are not going into countries to try and change them for western expats living there, we go to improve peoples lives even though at times it looks worse. These murders need to be caught and we need to rethink how we punish them. Stay strong France. 1 83 Click to rate  card lady, down south, United Kingdom, 12 minutes ago  I would say so much , but it's un PC and that's not right is it ??? FREEDOM OF SPEECH ! sometimes people say something you don't like , it's the world . you may not like it , find it funny etc . But it's someone elses point of view .... 0 42 Click to rate  Matrix 2, York, United Kingdom, 13 minutes ago  So Nick Clegg says we should remain "Tolerant" I wonder if he would still say this if it was his family being killed in cold blood. YOU Nick are a blot on the Human Race. 5 90 Click to rate  Emily Browne, London, United Kingdom, 13 minutes ago  Any religion, cult, people or things which undermine and seek to destroy democracy must themselves be destroyed and eliminated. No more pandering or excuses 2 91 Click to rate  Shad_Moss, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom, 13 minutes ago  Ok the newspaper insulted a religion but simple offensive words on a paper do not mean for the killing of people, its barbaric and unhumane and sickening, RIP to the dead. 5 67 Click to rate  i