Showing posts with label Rosenheim. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rosenheim. Show all posts

Other sites in southern Bavaria

Füssen

Standing in front of the Barracks for the Gebirgsartilleriebataillon 225 which still displays the WWII soldier on its façade. During the war, a subcamp of the Dachau concentration camp was located in the town. Steve McQueen's motorcycle stunts and many other scenes in The Great Escape were filmed in and around the town.
 Reichenstrasse, looking South at the Hohes Schloß Füssen at right and St Mang Basilica on the left.
 
Within the  Schlosshof
The Franziskanerkirche and Heiliggeistkirche einst und jetzt

Schönau
Near Berchtesgaden in Schönau is Haus Köppeleck, still in operation since its time as a Kinderlandverschickung during the war, as shown in Jugend im Reich (34) from 1942. Groups like the Black Forest Society (Schwarzwaldverein), a self-described ‘Fatherlandish and nationalist’ hiking club with local chapters throughout the region, organised at Whitsuntide hikes here as it was the birthplace of Leo Schlageter. Schlageter had been shot in 1923 by French occupation authorities in the Ruhr. Already a nationalist hero, Schlageter soon took his place among the pantheon of Nazi martyrs. By including pilgrimages to his hometown within the annual calendar of events, the Black Forest Society contributed to the creation of a Nazi politics of public memory.
  Schlageter's grave then and what's left of it today. After his execution Schlageter became a hero to some sections of the German population. Immediately after his death a Schlageter Memorial Society was formed, which agitated for the creation of a monument to honour him. The German Communist Party sought to debunk the emerging mythology of Schlageter by circulating a speech by Karl Radek portraying him as an honourable but misguided figure. It was the Nazi party who most fully exploited the Schlageter story. Hitler refers to him in Mein Kampf. Rituals were constructed to commemorate his death, and in 1931 the Memorial Society succeeded in getting a monument erected near the site of his execution. This was a giant cross placed amid sunken stone rings. Other smaller memorials were also created.  After 1933 Schlageter became one of the principal heroes of the Nazi regime. The Nazis renamed the Haus der Technik in Königsberg the Schlageterhaus. Hanns Johst, the Nazi playwright, wrote Schlageter (1933), a heroic drama about his life. It was dedicated to Hitler, and was performed on his first birthday in power as a theatrical manifesto of Nazism. The line "when I hear the word culture, I reach for my gun", often misattributed to Nazi leaders, derives from this play. The original line is slightly different: "Wenn ich Kultur höre ... entsichere ich meinen Browning," "Whenever I hear of culture... I release the safety-catch of my Browning!" (Act 1, Scene 1). It is spoken by another character in conversation with the young Schlageter.  Several important military ventures were also named for him, including the Jagdgeschwader 26 Schlageter fighter-wing of the Luftwaffe, and the naval vessel Albert Leo Schlageter. His name was also given as a title to two SA groups, the SA-Standarte 39 Schlageter at Düsseldorf and SA-Standarte 142 Albert Leo Schlageter at Lörrach. An army barracks on the south side of Freiburg was also named after him.
 The Hotel Schiffmeister in 1939 and today. Speer relates how
before we reached our destination, the Schiffmeister restaurant, a band of enthusiasts began excitedly following our group; they had belatedly realized whom they had encountered. Hitler in the lead, almost running, we barely reached the door before we were overtaken by the swelling crowd. We sat over coffee and cake while the big square outside 8l1ed. Hitler waited until police reinforcements had been brought up before he entered the open car, which had been driven there to meet us. The front seat was folded back, and he stood beside the driver, left hand resting on the windshield, so that even those standing at a distance could see him. Two men of the escort squad walked in front of the car, three more on either side, while the car moved at a snail"s pace through the throng. I sat as usual in the jump seat close behind Hitler and shall never forget that surge of rejoicing, the ecstasy reflected in so many faces. Wherever Hitler went during those first years of his rule, wherever his car stopped for a short time, such scenes were repeated. The mass exultation was not called forth by rhetoric or suggestion, but solely by the effect of Hitler's presence. Whereas individuals in the crowd were subject to this influence only for a few seconds at a time, Hitler himself was eternally exposed to the worship of the masses. At the time. I admired him for nevertheless retaining his informal habits in private.
Speer (48) Inside The Third Reich

 
Schneewinkellehen, Himmler's former residence (shown with daughter Gudrun)

Bodensee
 
The Bodensee fleet consisting of the Deutschland, Augsburg, Ravensburg, Baden and Allgäu with the Säntis and Altmann mountains of the Alps in the background then and now.


Obersee

 St. Bartholoma on Konigsee


Bad Wiessee
 
Now known as the Hotel Lederer am See, the Hotel Hanselbauer is where Hitler personally arrested the leader of the SA, Ernst Roehm. From Alan Bullock's Hitler: A Study in Tyranny (303):
In the early morning of the 30th a fast-moving column of cars tore down the road from Munich to Wiessee where Rohm and Heines were still asleep in their beds at the Hanselbauer Hotel. The accounts of what happened at Wiessee are contradictory. Heines, the S.A. Obergrappenfuhrer for Silesia, a convicted murderer who was found sleeping with one of Rohm's young men, is said to have been dragged out and shot on the road. Other accounts say he was taken to Munich with Rohm and shot there.
 
The interior of the Wandelhalle

Lindau
 
During the Third Reich and today

Mangfallbrücke
 
In 1935 and today
The Mangfallbrücke is part of the federal motorway 8 and between Munich and Rosenheim north of Weyarn the Mangfalltal. The 288 metre-long continuous girder bridge was completed in January 1936 and was one of the first large bridges of the autobahn network.
Gradually the network of highways spread. They followed routes that engineers had previously claimed impassable, for example across broad moors like the south shore of Lake Chiemsee in Bavaria. Long viaducts like the Mangfall bridge, 200 feet high, were personally selected by Hitler from seventy competing designs, for their simple but solid lines: "What we’re building," he explained, "will still be standing long after we’ve passed on." He toured the sites and spoke with the workers. "When I’m as old as you," he flattered one seventy-year-old labourer at Darmstadt, "I’d like to be able to work like you now." In November 1936, he gave orders that the Reich’s western frontiers were to be marked on the autobahns by monuments 130 feet high. Hitler's War (21)
Hitler below the bridge in 1935 and today, the third pylon being added after the bridge had been bombed during the war. The photograph comes from Adolf Hitler, Bilder aus dem Leben des Führers claiming extravagantly:

One of the first great bridges to be tackled was the Mangfall Bridge near München, with a length of approximately 300 metres and a height of approximately 60 metres above the base of the valley. From a contest which resulted in about 70 entrants, The Leader decided on the design to be used, and thereby determined the type of major bridge which afterwards was to be built at various other places. The lines and shapes of the constructions which The Leader himself determined are clear and simple, and at the same time ambitious and daring. Besides the shape, his decision is greatly influenced by the question of the soundness of the construction. Cheap construction parts, such as hollow pillars and pylons, are rejected by The Leader as they raise doubts about the unlimited durability.
Schloss Linderhof
 
Hitler in 1935 at the entrance to the smallest of the three palaces built by Ludwig II of Bavaria and the only one which he lived to see completed.

Rosenheim
 
It was at the Marienbad Sanitarium in Rosenheim that Hermann Wilhelm Göring was born on 12 January 1893. The photo on the right shows the SA marching during the the April 1, 1933 boycott of Jewish-owned businesses. Their signs read: "Germans shop in German stores! The Jew is stirring up hate against Germany! Therefore, do not go to Jewish stores!"
SA marching during the Party Congress in Rosenheim on 1 September 1929 with the same site on Max-Josefs-Platz today.
Hitler giving a speech to a crowd on the 15th anniversary of the NSDAP chapter in Rosenheim, the first major NS Ortsgruppe to have formed outside Munich, at Max Joseph Square on August 11 1935:
At that time [1920] we stood one man pitted against ten, and we did not let up from this struggle until success was won. Today nine members of the Volk as a whole stand pitted against one of the little doubters. if we did not capitulate then, we will certainly not capitulate now.
Fighting we once conquered the German Reich, and fighting we will maintain and preserve it. Let those who are against us not be deceived! We have never shunned the fight—not then, and not now. If they want the fight, they can have it! We will give them such a battering (niederschmettern) that they will abandon every thought of continuing this fight for the next fifteen years!
Today the Movement is the Movement of Germany; today this Movement has conquered the German nation and is shaping the Reich. Would that have been possible without the blessing of the Almighty? Or would those who ruined Germany back then pretend they had God’s blessing? What we are is what we have become not against, but by virtue of the will of Providence, and as long as we are loyal, honest and courageous in battle, as long as we believe in our great cause and do not capitulate, we will continue to enjoy the blessing of Providence. If those who ruined Germany in fifteen years fancy today, in light of the National Socialist achievements in reconstruction, that they see a ray of hope, I can only answer: That would please you fine, now that there is once again something to be squandered away!
And if Fate should choose to test us in the future, we hope that such hammer blows of Providence will make us truly hard and strong...
If we have the sacred will to educate our Volk in this unity, then after decades of unceasing work, National Socialism as a Weltanschauung will have become the great mutual experience consolidating our Volk, and then a Volk will exist which is filled to its innermost depths with the sense of its common task and mission. My belief in respect to the future is just as unshakeable as it was fifteen years ago in respect to today! At that time I created this flag and said that it would one day fly over the whole of Germany. Fifteen years have passed, and waving over Germany are our flags! And today I further predict: in five hundred years this flag will have become the lifeblood of the German nation!
 
Hitlerjugend during Kriegstag in 1942
The Flötzinger Bräustüberl, where Hitler spoke April 21, 1921. He celebrated his birthday here in 1925. Ten years later, after an operation to remove a polyp on May 23, Hitler spoke here for the first time on August 11, 1935. The NSDAP chapter in Rosenheim was celebrating its fifteenth anniversary; it was the first major NS Ortsgruppe to have formed outside Munich. Hitler made use of the opportunity to rail against his domestic opponents and to support current action being taken against Stahlhelm members and former Centrists, declaring:

At that time [1920] we stood one man pitted against ten, and we did not let up from this struggle until success was won.Today nine members of the Volk as a whole stand pitted against one of the little doubters. if we did not capitulate then, we will certainly not capitulate now. Fighting we once conquered the German Reich, and fighting we will maintain and preserve it. Let those who are against us not be deceived! We have never shunned the fight—not then, and not now. If they want the fight, they can have it! We will give them such a battering (niederschmettern) that they will abandon every thought of continuing this fight for the next fifteen years!

Today the Movement is the Movement of Germany; today this Movement has conquered the German nation and is shaping the Reich. Would that have been possible without the blessing of the Almighty? Or would those who ruined Germany back then pretend they had God’s blessing? What we are is what we have become not against, but by virtue of the will of Providence, and as long as we are loyal, honest and courageous in battle, as long as we believe in our great cause and do not capitulate, we will continue to enjoy the blessing of Providence.

If those who ruined Germany in fifteen years fancy today, in light of the National Socialist achievements in reconstruction, that they see a ray of hope, I can only answer: That would please you fine, now that there is once again something to be squandered away! [—]

And if Fate should choose to test us in the future, we hope that such hammer blows of Providence will make us truly hard and strong.

In closing, Hitler once again took on the role of prophet, predicting that the swastika flag would become, in five hundred years’ time, the lifeblood of the German Volk. He stated:
If we have the sacred will to educate our Volk in this unity, then after decades of unceasing work, National Socialism as a Weltanschauung will have become the great mutual experience consolidating our Volk, and then a Volk will exist which is filled to its innermost depths with the sense of its common task and mission. My belief in respect to the future is just as unshakeable as it was fifteen years ago in respect to today! At that time I created this flag and said that it would one day fly over the whole of Germany. Fifteen years have passed, and waving over Germany are our flags! And today I further predict: in five hundred years this flag will have become the lifeblood of the German nation!

Hitler had obviously just decided to make the swastika the sole German national flag and to pass a law to this effect at the upcoming Reich Party Congress. 
 
The Eisenbahnbrücke Prien-Aschau under construction in 1939 and today

Mittenwald
The town rathaus was built in 1939. The paintings remain on the façade save for the swastikas.
The Obermarkt then and now 
 
Ludendorff Kaserne in 1940 and today

Music Score May Lead to Nazi Gold

Garmisch-Partenkirchen

Hitler arriving at the start of the Games on February 6, 1936 in the new Skiing Stadium. According to the usual practices at the Olympic Games, these were conducted under the auspices of the head of state of the host nation, meaning Hitler in this case. After the participating nations had ceremoniously marched into the Stadium at 11:00 a.m., Hitler spoke the following words “with resounding clarity,” as the German News Bureau phrased it: 
I hereby declare the Fourth Winter Olympics of 1936 in Garmisch- Partenkirchen open to the public! 
Later he himself congratulated every victorious German athlete by sending a telegram.

Hitler saluting the athletes from the balcony of the Olympic House during the opening ceremony.
 
Reliefs remaining from the time
 
In 1936 this was the site of the Winter Olympic Games. Hitler had taken full advantage of the staging of the 1936 Winter Olympic Games in Garmisch- Partenkirchen and the summer games in Berlin to divert the attention of the German public and the international community as an whole from his military and political activities, in particular his goal of extending the military sovereignty of the Reich to the Rhineland and of prolonging the one-year compulsory military service to two years, having earlier chosen the shorter term of service only to make its introduction politically and psychologically more acceptable.
 
The ski run at the Olympia Skischanze in 1936 and as it appears today
 
The rathaus in town, then and now, constructed by Oswald Bieber by 1936. Bieber was responsible for a number of Nazi buildings including  the Munich-based SS-Standarte 1 „Deutschland“ and the Haus des Deutschen Rechts. Frühlingstraße
  
Hotel Husar in 1939 and today
  
The Bräustüberl in 1937 and today
  
Schloss Elmau
Oberammergau  
 Contemporary scholar James Shapiro writes that “Oberammergau is justly celebrated as one of the few places in the world where theatre still matters.” The Bavarian play began with a vow made in 1633: villagers would perform the Passion Play every ten years if God would spare them from the plague which had ravaged neighboring towns and threatened to consume them. With few exceptions, they’ve kept their pledge with God, and this devotion had made Oberammergau, a town just southwest of Munich, an international phenomenon.  Oberammergau attracts a capacity crowd of over 400,000 visitors every ten years (with applications for tickets nearing 4 million). No expense is spared in its lavish production, but verisimilitude is important for Oberammergau: no makeup or wigs are allowed onstage; actors must have been born in Oberammergau or reside in the city for twenty years before they’re eligible to perform; and until 1990, female actors had to be under 35 and single.  
 
In 1934 the play gained infamy for the dubious honour of hosting Hitler as he courted the popular vote for the institution of a new office, Führer and Reich Chancellor. Many of the actors in principle roles (excepting Judas) were already party Nazis, and voting records indicate that almost 90% of the town’s inhabitants favoured Hitler in the general election. In 1942 Hitler would go so far as to claim that the play showed Pilate as a man of “superior race” while the Sanhedrin’s call for crucifixion revealed the whole “muck and mire of Jewry.” However, forced to choose between guns and God, Hitler closed the play in 1940 to build a munitions factory nearby. 
 
On August 13, 1934, Hitler and his large entourage visited the town to attend the 300th anniversary of the Passion play and addressed a large crowd from the Hotel Wittelbach's balcony.
The flags have changed in front of the Forstamt
 The Kofel behind remains unchanged
Theatre produced by the Nazis. In his Table Talk Hitler declared that
One of our most important tasks will be to save future generations from a similar political fate and to maintain for ever watchful in them a knowledge of the menace of Jewry. For this reason alone it is vital that the Passion Play be continued at Oberammergau; for never has the menace of Jewry been so convincingly portrayed as in this presentation of what happened in the times of the Romans. There one sees in Pontius Pilate a Roman racially and intellectually so superior, that he stands out like a firm, clean rock in the middle of the whole muck and mire of Jewry.
Feldberg
Outside of one of the buildings near the Feldberg Ski Resort

The Naturfreundehaus then and now
  
The  Bismarckdenkmal remains in situ
 
The Feldsee


Kempten  
Also in the Allgäu is this town where Hitler visited a number of times, speaking here at the Kornhaus on March 24, 1928. His July 30, 1932 speech produced the following line used as a Wochenspruch later in the opening weeks of the war: “I do not believe in any right that is not protected by force." 
 
St.-Lorenz-Kirche then and now

Oberaudorf
 
Within Rosenheim kreis is the the birthplace of Pope Benedict XVI's mother, German politician Edmund Stoiber and footballer Bastian Schweinsteiger of Bayern Munich. The burgtor then and now.


Herrsching am Ammersee
 
Herrsching am Ammersee on the east shore of the Ammersee southwest of Munich is usually the starting point of trips to Andechs Abbey. This, one of the most impressive Nazi eagles remaining in Germany, is found on the façade of the former Reichsfinanzschule.

Schloß Herrenchiemsee
Hitler in the stunning Grosse Spiegelgalerie (Great Hall of Mirrors). This tunnel of light runs the length of the garden (98m, or 10m longer than that in Versailles). It sports 52 candelabra and 33 great glass chandeliers with 7000 candles, which took 70 servants half an hour to light. In late July it becomes a superb venue for classical concerts. The Paradeschlafzimmer (State Bedroom) features a canopied bed perching altarlike on a pedestal behind a golden balustrade. This was the heart of the palace, where morning and evening audiences were held. It is the king’s bedroom, the Kleines Blaues Schlafzimmer (Little Blue Bedroom), that really takes the cake. The decoration is sickly sweet, encrusted with gilded stucco and wildly extravagant carvings. The room is bathed in a soft blue light emanating from a glass globe at the foot of the bed. It supposedly took 18 months for a technician to perfect the lamp to the king’s satisfaction. Admission to the palace also entitles you to a spin around the König-Ludwig II-Museum, where you can see the king’s christening and coronation robes, more blueprints of megalomaniac buildings and his death mask.     

Chiemsee    
 
Raststätte Chiemsee, the first Autobahn rest stop, since 2011 the Klinik Medical Park Chiemseeblick (Psychosomatik). Above is Hitler and, returning from his meeting with Hitler at the Obersalzberg that led to the Munich Agreement, Neville Chamberlain (between Herbert von Dirksen and Joachim von Ribbentrop) on September 15, 1938.  
 
Of this project, Adolf Hitler, Bilder aus dem Leben des Führers would claim how Hitler merited full credit:         
 The Leader is regularly informed of the progress of the work by the Inspector General. In the course of these briefings The Leader intervenes decisively in many details to influence the basic attitude of the coworkers to this work according to his will. In these discussions over the details, it has happened again and again that a decision made by The Leader has proved itself to be the only possible solution in the course of time. An example of this was the decision about the lines of the section on the southern bank of the Chiemsee in Upper Bavaria. Between this lake and the rising mountains, there is a moor which is several kilometres wide. The crossing of this moor had caused severe difficulties for the railroad. The first design of the line for the Reich Autobahn avoided the moor in a wide arc to the side of the bank towards the south. The Leader did not agree to this line, which offered the road neither a view of the lake nor a view of the mountains. He requested that further and more thorough investigations should be made to determine whether a possibility could still be found to put the road closer to the lake. At his instigation further extensive drilling was carried out in the vicinity of the lake. To everyone's great surprise these further investigations revealed a rocklike ledge close to the lake. This ledge was just wide enough to enable the road to be built close to the side of the lake in accordance with The Leader's wishes. 

Lambacher Hof
Another favourite of Hitler's was the Lambacher Hof on the Chiemsee and which has changed very little since.
Hitler usually ordered preparations for the drive to "the mountain"-Obersalzberg. We rode over dusty highways in several open cars; the autobahn to Salzburg did not exist in those days, although it was being built on a priority basis. Usually the motorcade stopped for coffee in a village inn at Lambach am Chiemsee, which served delicious pastries that Hitler could scarcely ever resist. Then the passengers in the following cars once more swallowed dust for two hours, for the column rode in close file.
Speer (46) Inside the Third Reich
Ordensburg Sonthofen
 
Ordensburg Sonthofen was started in 1934. The school was designed by architect Hermann Giesler and was finished ready for the first students two years later. The school was to receive and teach students in their third school year and then afterwards send them to Marienburg in East Prussia for their final year. On November 21, 1937 Hitler attended the inauguration of the Ordensburg Sonthofen in the Allgäu, which was the third to open its gates. There, before all the regional and district Nazi Party leaders (Kreisleiter and Gauamtsleiter) assembled, Hitler delivered a two-hour “secret speech” on “the structure and organization of the leadership of the Volk” (Volksführung). The content of this address has been preserved for us. In the introduction, Hitler presented an overview of his version of German history over the last three hundred to four hundred years. He continuously attempted to substantiate his claims with numbers, carelessly juggling enormous figures (the majority of which were incorrect). Needless to say, he could not resist citing his favourite historical example, the claim that, of the 18.5 million Germans at the outbreak of the Thirty Years’ War, only 3.6 million survived. Further “historical observations” on his part culminated in a comparison of the relations between the people of Austria and Prussia and the similar bonds that existed between the English and the German people. He explained these ties in the following manner:
Since in international life there are only natural, sober interests, it should be based neither on gratitude nor on family connections. Family connections were as useless in preserving Prussia and Austria from war as they were for Germany and England. In Europe, we have more difficult obstacles to over- come than those, for instance, that exist for England—which needed only its naval supremacy to occupy large living spaces with relatively little loss of blood.
Nonetheless: we had Europe once before. We lost it only because our leadership lacked the initiative that would have been necessary to not only maintain our position on a long- term basis but also to expand it.
Then Hitler turned to the “Germanic Empire of the German Nation,” the birth of which he himself had proclaimed at the Reich Party congress of September 13.
Now he declared:

 Today a new state is being established, the unique feature of which is that it sees its foundation not in Christianity and not in a concept of state; rather, it places its primary emphasis on the self-contained Volksgemeinschaft. Hence it is significant that the “Germanic Empire of the German Nation” now puts this supremely capable concept of the future into practice, merciless against all adversaries, against all religious fragmentation, against all fragmentation into parties.
This observation was followed by a mystical recollection of the German past:
If we regard our German history in a very extensive sense from our most dim and distant past up to today, we are the richest Volk in Europe. And if, with utmost tolerance, we al- low our great German heroes to march by, all our great leaders of the past, all our great Germanic and German emperors— for they were great without exception—England would have to shrink before us.
However, Hitler soon returned to the present, that is, to his own claim to power, and remarked:
It is this unification of the German nation that gives us the moral justification to step before the world with vital demands. The fact is that ultimate justice resides in power. And power, in international life, resides in the self-containment of the nations themselves. Today the German nation has finally been given what it has lacked for centuries, namely, the organisation of a leadership of the Volk. Today we are laying claim to the leadership of the Volk, i.e., we alone are authorized to lead the Volk as such—that means every man and every woman. The lifelong relationships between the sexes is something we will organize. We shall form the child!
In this context, Hitler also commented on questions of a religious nature that preoccupied him in particular this year. He addressed the churches formally:
The Nazi Party is the largest organization the world has ever seen. All counted, it encompasses a total of twenty-five million people and has 300,000 functionaries. It is quite obvious that an organization that is only eighteen years from its founding cannot be the same as it would be after one hundred years. Yet the important thing is that we equip it with the law according to which it came to power and that it shall retain. Here we have established the basic rule of absolute obedience and absolute authority. Just as the army—the weapon— cannot prevail without this law of the absolute authority of each and every superior to those below him and his absolute responsibility to those above, neither can the political leadership of this weapon prevail. For what is gained by the weapon is ultimately subject to political administration, and what the political administration wants, the weapon is to procure. The leadership of the Volk in former times, the church, also recognized only this one law of life: blind obedience and absolute authority.
At the end of his “secret speech,” Hitler expatiated upon the requirement of political leaders in addition to blind obedience: bravery.

Old Germany was overthrown because it did not possess this zealous blind will, did not have this confidence and this serenity. New Germany will be victorious because it integrates these virtues and at present has already integrated them in an extremely difficult struggle. I know quite well that this is independent of the individual. I know quite well that, were anything to happen to me today, the next one would take my place and continue in the same fashion, just as zealously; because that, too, is part of this Movement.
Just as it is not possible to instantly turn a political bourgeois association into a fighting group of heroes, it will be equally impossible to ever turn this Movement, that was built up from the very beginning on courage and initiative, into a bourgeois association. That is also the future task above all of these schools: to conduct this test of courage over and over again, to break with the opinion that only the soldier must be brave. Whoever is a political leader is always a soldier too! And whoever lacks bravery cannot be a soldier. He must be prepared for action at all times. In the beginning, courage had to be the basic prerequisite for someone to find his way to the party—and it really was, otherwise no one came. Today we have to install artificial obstacles, artificial trenches over which the person has to jump. That is where he now has to prove whether he is brave. Because if he is not brave, he is of no use to us.
 However, by the beginning of WWII, training was downsized and towards the end of the war it was used as a military hospital.

Wasserburg

The Brucktor in the 1930s and today